Installing Currie Third Member Unit: Pinion Support and Gear Assembly

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In a recent post we took you inside Currie’s facilities to show how the professionals there installed a Currie third member unit. We were invited to take a trip into the shop with our camera to get a first-hand look at how to assemble a brand-new Ford-style, but Currie-built, third member gear case. Now take a look at the next steps of how it was done. Be sure to stay tuned as we will cover the full installation in future posts!

 

The crew starts to build the unit by installing the carrier bearings onto the TSD posi unit in a press.

The crew starts to build the unit by installing the carrier bearings onto the TSD posi unit in a press.

 

Then they put red Loctite onto the ring gear bolts and install them into the ring gear with an impact wrench.

Then they put red Loctite onto the ring gear bolts and install them into the ring gear with an impact wrench.

 

Cross-torquing them from side to side gradually pulls the ring gear onto the carrier. They finish by torquing them to proper specs with a torque wrench.

Cross-torquing them from side to side gradually pulls the ring gear onto the carrier. They finish by torquing them to proper specs with a torque wrench.

 

Next, they press the large pinion bearing onto the pinion gear. Then they install the pinion support, pinion depth shims and solid spacer, and the outer bearing onto the gear. Next, they press on the outer bearing. Here’s a look at the completed unit.

Next, they press the large pinion bearing onto the pinion gear. Then they install the pinion support, pinion depth shims and solid spacer, and the outer bearing onto the gear. Next, they press on the outer bearing. Here’s a look at the completed unit.

 

The pinion seal is now installed. They use a hammer and their own custom seal driver tool.

The pinion seal is now installed. They use a hammer and their own custom seal driver tool.

 

Here a set-up yoke is installed onto the pinion gear with an impact.

Here a set-up yoke is installed onto the pinion gear with an impact.

 

An O-ring is installed onto the back side of the pinion support; this seals the pinion support to its machined bore in the gear case.

An O-ring is installed onto the back side of the pinion support; this seals the pinion support to its machined bore in the gear case.

 

In this photo you can see the pocket bearing and pocket bearing retainer.

In this photo you can see the pocket bearing and pocket bearing retainer.

 

They’ll install the pocket bearing and pocket bearing retainer into the gear case by dropping the bearing into the hole, like so.

They’ll install the pocket bearing and pocket bearing retainer into the gear case by dropping the bearing into the hole, like so.

 

A driver tool is used to install the bearing, and then the same driver tool is used again to install the retainer. Here you can see the bearing and retainer installed.

A driver tool is used to install the bearing, and then the same driver tool is used again to install the retainer. Here you can see the bearing and retainer installed.

 

The bore in the front of the gear case is greased in preparation for the pinion support installation. Proper pinion depth shims for the selected components are installed onto the pinion support mounting surface.

The bore in the front of the gear case is greased in preparation for the pinion support installation. Proper pinion depth shims for the selected components are installed onto the pinion support mounting surface.

 

Now, the pinion support/pinion gear assembly is dropped in and checked to see how freely the pinion spins. It’s common that the casting may need to be trimmed to ensure that the retainer for the pocket bearing fits and allows the pinion to spin freely. Again, this is common, but can only be checked by installing and even reinstalling the pinion gear until it’s right.

Now, the pinion support/pinion gear assembly is dropped in and checked to see how freely the pinion spins. It’s common that the casting may need to be trimmed to ensure that the retainer for the pocket bearing fits and allows the pinion to spin freely. Again, this is common, but can only be checked by installing and even reinstalling the pinion gear until it’s right.

 

Stay tuned!

 

Text by Marcel Venable

Photos by the MCP staff

 

 

 

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